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Midwifery - Home

New Books

The following list contains the most recently added items charged to Midwifery and the list is refreshed on a nightly basis. If you see a title that the library does NOT have, please contact Mr. Thomson, the subject specialist or fill out "Please Buy This".

Faculty Consultants

This research guide has been prepared in consultation with Prof. Lisa Morgan  and Dr. Crestina L. Beites of the Midwifery program.

Welcome

The purpose of this guide is to recommend print and electronic resources for conducting research in midwifery  in the Library.  Click on the links on the left for suggestions about starting your research, getting books and articles, and finding other useful tools for research in Midwifery.

Connect from Off Campus

Most of the Library's online resources are available to you from anywhere off campus.  See: UL Proxy Accounts.

Library Instruction

To learn more about the library and its resources and how you can exploit them to your advantage, register in the Research Skills Tutorial on D2L. There are several sections in the tutorial with a short quiz at the end of each; at the end you will receive a Certificate of Completion. Many professors require you to take this tutorial--and once you finish it, you can save your certificate to reprint as often as necessary.

In the fall,  the library hosts live Orientation tours as well as Zotero classes which you can sign up for at the library's entrance, and even after the formal schedule is finished, we are very happy to put on special classes at the request of at least 5 students. If you would like to arrange a special class, or you think your course would benefit from some in-class library instruction, please ask your professor to contact the librarian responsible for your faculty to set up some sessions.

Subject Librarian

AThomson's picture

Name: Ashley Thomson, BEd, MA, MLS
Position Title: Instruction Librarian
Email Address: athomson
Extension: 3322
Office Location: J.N. Desmarais Library, 30-245

Help with a Paper

I am available to help you throughout the academic year.  If you would like to arrange for an individual appointment, please e-mail me with a requested date and time, and a brief description of your project.

More Help

In the library: The Library User Assistance Desk to your immediate left as you enter the library is a good place to start.

By email: Email the librarian responsible for your faculty for a reply during regular working hours.

By telephone: 705-675-4803, or toll free at 1-800-661-1058, ext. 2

By chat: With our "Ask the Library" service. For more information, see About Ask a Librarian.

For Distance Education students: Telephone: 1-800-661-1058, ext. 2 or email: Distance_l@laurentian.ca

Get Started

Quick Tips on Preparing for Research

Before you start:

  • understand the key terms you may be using as well as the general area that interests you;
  • think about ways to narrow your topic, making it as specific as possible (unless you have been given a specific topic to research!);
  • create a thesis statement;
  • list  the main concepts (key words) included in your thesis statement (research question), then based on your readings;
  • find as many synonyms as you can for each main concept. You are now ready to start searching in the library's catalogue and databases.

When you are looking for definitions or if you don’t know much about a specific subject, reference works such as dictionaries and encyclopedias become invaluable because they contain relatively short—and understandable—articles. These articles often lay out the parameters of a subject and can assist you in trying to narrow your topic. Often such articles are accompanied by lists of readings (bibliographies) which allow you to explore your topic further.

Dictionaries, encyclopedias and guides

Some sources that may be useful for quick review of terminology related to midwifery practice (treatments, conditions, techniques, pharmaceuticals etc.)

These can also serve as a useful starting point for your research. When you look up part of your broad topic idea, its definition might suggest related topics, or sub-topics, which can suggest how you might narrow or focus your topic or clarify your research question or thesis.

NOTE: Any of the above with "Reference" listed as the "Shelving location" are items which generally cannot be checked out/ do not leave the Library (except with special permission from the midwifery Librarian, or any other Librarian.) 

Get Books and Theses

Why Use Books?

  • Books are extremely valuable resources when doing in-depth research on a topic! Authors have hundreds of pages to give detailed explanations and background information surrounding the various facets of your research interest.
  • Using this kind of in-depth information will make it easier to form a research question or thesis statement (or even spark your inspiration)
  • The bibliographies found in books are extensive, and will point you to other resources to add to your own resource list.
  • Remember: scholars write journal articles under the assumption that you already have a relatively thorough understanding of the topic – this means that you will likely not find the foundational information needed for your topic in the beginning stages of your research process. In this sense, books become indispensable

Searching the Catalogue

The catalogue is your primary tool for finding books in the J.N. Desmarais Library. You can also use the catalogue to find other materials, including government publications and journals (the journals themselves--not individual articles).

You can search the catalogue by:

  • Keyword
  • Title
  • Author
  • Subject
  • Journal Title

When you know the book you are searching for, pick Title or Author; when you are searching for a topic, start with Keyword unless you know the exact Subject heading describing your topic.

More on searching the Catalogue is available in Module 5 of the Research Skills Tutorial in D2L.

ebooks

E-books are located in two different places:

  • Some may be located by using the library’s catalogue and selecting "Electronic" item form. These records will have [electronic resource] in the title.
  • E-books can also be located by searching in e-book collections. Searching in these collections is the same as searching in a database.
 

Recommended E-Book Databases for Midwifery

WorldCat

With nearly 200 million records representing titles held by nearly 75,000 libraries you will find almost any book ever published in the English language in WorldCat.
Search Tips:  Once you log-in, click on the Help Button: Help button
After your search, when you see a title that interests you, click on it and within the record you will see an image for "Get it @ Laurentian" :
   Get it @ Laurentian
When you click on that, you will be led to a menu which allows you to check for availability in Laurentian’s catalogue or order the item through ILL - Interlibrary Loan.
Note: While a free version of WorldCat is available online, we recommend that you use the university's subscription version of WorldCat because it offers the "Get it @ Laurentian" feature and more powerful search functionality.

Shelf Searching

Laurentian uses LC Classification. Some patrons may wish to browse for books in the stacks; Midwifery is generally classified under Medicine (R). The following are designations that are often associated with Midwifery:

RA: Public aspects of medicine

RG: Gynecology and obstetrics

RT: Nursing

Theses

In addition to books, you may wish to search for book-length Master's theses or Ph.D dissertations.

Best bet:  Dissertations and Theses (ProQuest).

If you are also looking for recent theses or dissertations produced by Laurentian graduates, check out LUZONE.  Note that since 2013, before graduation all Masters and Doctoral candidates MUST deposit their theses or dissertations in this repository.

Get Articles

Articles: Quick Tips

The databases to the right provide references to many scholarly journal articles and papers.

  1. Start off with keyword searches expressing your topic. Keyword searching crosses all fields.
  2. Use Search Operators such as "OR" and "AND" to expand or reduce your results.
  3. Review those items that look relevant, then, exploit the details within those entries to help lead you to other relevant articles.
    • Pay attention to the subject headings (often called "descriptors") to see how the database describes your topic and use them to find related articles.
    • Find other papers written by the same author; these will typically be on similar subjects.
    • Follow citation trails: other articles that have cited this article will probably be on a related subject and will include citations to other articles of interest.
  4. For more Secrets of Searching a Database, review that section in How to Research Like a Librarian.

Peer Review

Peer Review is the evaluation of creative work by scholars in the same field in order to maintain or enhance the quality of the work in that field.

In the case of peer reviewed journals, which are usually academic, peer review generally refers to the evaluation of the articles in them prior to publication. For more, check out this definition of peer review.

  • To ascertain whether a journal is peer reviewed, consult Ulrichsweb.

Midwifery Journals Available Online

Except as noted otherwise, each of these journals is searchable.  We recommend you use the Advanced Search option and ensure that you are searching the journal you have selected.  For any article retrieved before or after the dates held by Laurentian, please fill out an interlibrary loan request form for it, and the article will be emailed to you.

Current

Older

Recommended databases

  • CINAHL ?

    Description: CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature) provides indexing for more than 2,980 journals from the fields of nursing and allied health. The database contains more than 2,000,000 records dating back to 1981.

  • Evidence Based Medicine Reviews Multifile ?

    Description: Provides systematic reviews of topics; article reviews; and access to definitive controlled trials in the area of evidence based medicine. Incudes 1. EBM Reviews - Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2005--; 2. Database Field Guide EBM Reviews - ACP Journal Club 1991- , 3. Database Field Guide EBM Reviews - Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, 4. Database Field Guide EBM Reviews - Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials 4. Database Field Guide EBM Reviews - Cochrane Methodology Register 5. Database Field Guide EBM Reviews - Health Technology Assessment 6. Database Field Guide EBM Reviews - 7. NHS Economic Evaluation Database

  • Joanna Briggs Institute EBP Database ?

    Description: This comprehensive database covers a wide range of medical, nursing, and health science specialties and includes a unique suite of information that’s been analyzed, appraised, and prepared by expert reviewers at JBI so you and your team can integrate the world’s best evidence into your practice.

  • Medline (Ovid) ?

    Description: The latest bibliographic citations and author abstracts from more than 5,500 biomedicine and life sciences journals in nearly 40 languages.

  • NOSM: Health Information Resource Centre Databases ?

    Description: The Northern Ontario School of Medicine (NOSM) collection of health-related research resources is available to the Laurentian University community. The NOSM collection includes resources that are not part of the Laurentian University collection.

  • ProQuest Nursing & Allied Health Source ?

    Description: Health care information covering nursing, allied health, alternative and complementary medicine. Includes over 890 full-text journals and 12,300 full-text dissertations.

  • PubMed ?

    Description: PubMed comprises more than 21 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

  • UpToDate ?

    Description: "UpToDate® is an evidence-based, physician-authored clinical decision support resource which clinicians trust to make the right point-of-care decisions. More than 5,700 world-renowned physician authors, editors and peer reviewers use a rigorous editorial process to synthesize the most recent medical information into trusted, evidence-based recommendations that are proven to improve patient care and quality." It is a NOSM registered Database

  • Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2005- ?

    Description: The reviews are presented in two types: Cochrane Methodology Reviews are full-text systematic reviews of methodological studies. The reviews are both highly structured and systematic. Evidence from methodological research is included or excluded on the basis of explicit quality criteria, thus minimizing bias. Each review covers a specific and well-defined area of methodology. Data from studies are often combined statistically to increase the power of the findings of numerous studies, which on their own may be too small to produce reliable results. In such cases, the review may also include graphs presenting the data from each individual study. Protocols provide place-markers for reviews, which are currently being written. They summarize the background and the rationale of the review.

Databases with relevant content

  • BDSP (Banque de données en santé publique) ?

    Description: Public health database with information in French and English.

  • LactMed (Drugs and Lactation Database) ?

    Description: "A peer-reviewed and fully referenced database of drugs to which breastfeeding mothers may be exposed. Among the data included are maternal and infant levels of drugs, possible effects on breastfed infants and on lactation, and alternate drugs to consider."

  • Scholars Portal - Ejournals ?

    Description: Scholars Portal is a digital repository of over 20 million scholarly articles drawn from journals covering every academic discipline.

  • Population Index ?

    Description: The primary reference tool to the world's population literature, Population Index presents an annotated bibliography of recently published books, journal articles, working papers, and other materials on population topics. The website contains 46,035 abstracts of demographic literature published in the period 1986-2000.

Citation Sources

When researching a paper, it is useful to consult the citations used by the author of an article that you find relevant.  But that article itself may have been cited by other authors after it was first written. Two sources help you identify such citations:

Getting Articles @ Laurentian

In any database, when you see an article that interests you, click on it and, unless the article is available within the database itself, within the record you will see an image that says "Get it @ Laurentian":

Get it at Laurentian

When you click on that,  you will arrive at a menu which will lead to an electronic copy of the article you want, or, if not available electronically, to Laurentian's catalogue which will allow you to check if the article is available in print in the library, and if not, to a final link which allows you to order the item through Interlibrary loan.

Data and Statistics

E-Data

International, national, and provincial statistical health data are important sources of information for public health, allowing for the analysis, evaluation, and development of policies and services.

Stats Guide

For more information, visit our research guide on Data and Statistics.

Feel free to email data@laurentian.ca for further help in conducting research with data and statistics.

Statistics Canada

   Statistics Canada provides recent data, profiles, indicators, methods, and studies on Canadians.

Citing Sources and Zotero

Why Cite?

We cite sources to acknowledge the work of others, as well as to avoid academic dishonesty or plagiarism.

The University of Toronto  has made available a comprehensive set of guidelines on How NOT to Plagiarize which deserves to be read by every student.

Citation Style in Laurentian's Midwifery Program

At Laurentian, professors will specify the citation style to be used.  In Midwifery,  the Vancouver style is commonly required.  To learn more about Vancouver and other citation styles, consult Laurentian's guide to citation styles.

Zotero

Zotero is a FREE web-based citation manager that will allow you to: 

  • Directly import references from article databases, the library catalogue, e-book collections, etc.
  • Manage and organize your references.
  • Create a bibliography.
  • Share your references with others
  • Add in-text citation and a bibliography directly into your assignment 

Getting started with Zotero: