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New Books

The following list contains the most recently added items charged to History, and the  list is refreshed on a nightly basis.  If you see a title that the library does NOT have, please contact Mr. Maley, the subject specialist or fill out "Please Buy This".

Faculty Consultant

This guide has been prepared in consultation with Dr. Janice Liedl of the History Department.

History Program

For information about Laurentian's History  program, please visit the program's web site.

Welcome

The purpose of this guide is to recommend print and electronic resources for conducting research in History in the Library.  Click on the links on the left for suggestions about starting your research, getting books and articles, and finding other useful tools for research in history. 

Connect from Off Campus

Most of the Library's online resources are available to you from anywhere off campus.  See: UL Proxy Accounts.

Library Instruction

To learn more about the library and its resources and how you can exploit them to your advantage, register in the Research Skills Tutorial on D2L. There are several sections in the tutorial with a short quiz at the end of each; at the end you will receive a Certificate of Completion. Many professors require you to take this tutorial--and once you finish it, you can save your certificate to reprint as often as necessary.

In the fall,  the library hosts live Orientation tours as well as Zotero classes which you can sign up for at the library's entrance, and even after the formal schedule is finished, we are very happy to put on special classes at the request of at least 5 students. If you would like to arrange a special class, or you think your course would benefit from some in-class library instruction, please ask your professor to contact the librarian responsible for your faculty to set up some sessions.

Subject Librarian

Name: Desmond Maley
Position Title: Associate Librarian
Email Address: dmaley@laurentian.ca
Extension: 3323
Office Location: 30-246, J.-N. Desmarais Library

Help with a Paper

I am available to help you throughout the academic year.  If you would like to arrange for an individual appointment, please e-mail me with a requested date and time, and a brief description of your project.

More Help

In the library: The Library User Assistance Desk to your immediate left as you enter the library is a good place to start.

By email: Email the librarian responsible for your faculty for a reply during regular working hours.

By telephone: 705-675-4803, or toll free at 1-800-661-1058, ext. 2

By chat: With our "Ask the Library" service. For more information, see About Ask a Librarian.

For Distance Education students: Telephone: 1-800-661-1058, ext. 2 or email: Distance_l@laurentian.ca

Get Started

Quick Tips on Preparing for Research

Before you start:

  • understand the key terms you may be using as well as the general area that interests you;
  • think about ways to narrow your topic, making it as specific as possible (unless you have been given a specific topic to research!);
  • create a thesis statement;
  • list  the main concepts (key words) included in your thesis statement (research question), then based on your readings;
  • find as many synonyms as you can for each main concept. You are now ready to start searching in the library's catalogue and databases.

When you are looking for definitions or if you don’t know much about a specific subject, reference works such as dictionaries and encyclopedias become invaluable because they contain relatively short—and understandable—articles. These articles often lay out the parameters of a subject and can assist you in trying to narrow your topic. Often such articles are accompanied by lists of readings (bibliographies) which allow you to explore your topic further.

 

The best general reference work is: The Encyclopedia Britannica. The two panels to the right feature some of the key research aids in  the discipline of History.

Get Books and Theses

Why Use Books?

  • Books are extremely valuable resources when doing in-depth research on a topic! Authors have hundreds of pages to give detailed explanations and background information surrounding the various facets of your research interest.
  • Using this kind of in-depth information will make it easier to form a research question or thesis statement (or even spark your inspiration)
  • The bibliographies found in books are extensive, and will point you to other resources to add to your own resource list.
  • Remember: scholars write journal articles under the assumption that you already have a relatively thorough understanding of the topic – this means that you will likely not find the foundational information needed for your topic in the beginning stages of your research process. In this sense, books become indispensable

Searching the Catalogue

The catalogue is your primary tool for finding books in the J.N. Desmarais Library. You can also use the catalogue to find other materials, including government publications and journals (the journals themselves--not individual articles).

You can search the catalogue by:

  • Keyword
  • Title
  • Author
  • Subject
  • Journal Title

When you know the book you are searching for, pick Title or Author; when you are searching for a topic, start with Keyword unless you know the exact Subject heading describing your topic.

More on searching the Catalogue is available in Module 5 of the Research Skills Tutorial in D2L.

E-Books

E-books are located in two different places:
  • Some may be located by using the library’s catalogue and selecting "Electronic" item form. These records will have[electronic resource] in the title.
  • E-books can also be located by searching in e-book collections. Searching in these collections is the same as searching in a database.
 
Note:  The next panel lists some recommended E-book collections; there are several more collections that appear in the Primary Sources section of this guide.

Recommended E-Book Collections

Recent Acquisitions

The following list contains the most recently added items charged to History, and the  list is refreshed on a nightly basis.  If you see a title that the library does NOT have, please contact the Desmond Maley, the subject specialist.

WorldCat

With nearly 200 million records representing titles held by nearly 75,000 libraries you will find almost any book ever published in the English language in WorldCat.
Search Tips:  Once you log-in, click on the Help Button: Help button
After your search, when you see a title that interests you, click on it and within the record you will see an image for "Get it @ Laurentian" :
   Get it @ Laurentian
When you click on that, you will be led to a menu which allows you to check for availability in Laurentian’s catalogue or order the item through ILL - Interlibrary Loan.
Note: While a free version of WorldCat is available online, we recommend that you use the university's subscription version of WorldCat because it offers the "Get it @ Laurentian" feature and more powerful search functionality.

Book Reviews

For sources of Book Reviews and tips on writing a review, consult the Research Guide on this topic.

Theses

In addition to books, you may wish to search for book-length Master's theses or Ph.D dissertations.

Best bet:  Dissertations and Theses (ProQuest).

If you are also looking for recent theses or dissertations produced by Laurentian graduates, check out our Research Repository - LUZONE.  Note that since 2013, before graduation all Masters and Doctoral candidates MUST deposit their theses or dissertations in this repository.

Get Articles

Articles: Quick Tips

The databases to the right provide references to many scholarly journal articles and papers.

  1. Start off with keyword searches expressing your topic. Keyword searching crosses all fields.
  2. Use Search Operators such as "OR" and "AND" to expand or reduce your results.
  3. Review those items that look relevant, then, exploit the details within those entries to help lead you to other relevant articles.
    • Pay attention to the subject headings (often called "descriptors") to see how the database describes your topic and use them to find related articles.
    • Find other papers written by the same author; these will typically be on similar subjects.
    • Follow citation trails: other articles that have cited this article will probably be on a related subject and will include citations to other articles of interest.
  4. For more Secrets of Searching a Database, review that section in How to Research Like a Librarian.

Peer Review

Peer Review is the evaluation of creative work by scholars in the same field in order to maintain or enhance the quality of the work in that field.

In the case of peer reviewed journals, which are usually academic, peer review generally refers to the evaluation of the articles in them prior to publication. For more, check out this definition of peer review.

  • To ascertain whether a journal is peer reviewed, consult Ulrichsweb.

Recommended Starting Databases

  • America: History and Life ?

    Description: Covers literature on the history and culture of the U.S. and Canada from prehistory to the present. The index includes 1,700 journals from as far back as 1910. Access is limited to 6 concurrent users.

  • Canadian Labour History Bibliography, 1976-2009 ?

    Description: Historical studies of Canadian labour from 1800 to 1975.

  • Historical Abstracts ?

    Description: Historical Abstracts covers the history of the world (excluding the United States and Canada) from 1450 to the present, including world history, military history, women's history, history of education, and more. This authoritative database provides indexing of more than 2,300 academic historical journals in over 40 languages back to 1955. Access is limited to 6 concurrent users.

  • Iter: Gateway to the Middle Ages and Renaissance ?

    Description: Covers secondary sources pertaining to the Middle Ages and Renaissance (400-1700). Citations for books and journal material (articles, reviews, review articles, bibliographies, catalogues, abstracts and discographies) are included, as are citations for dissertation abstracts and essays in books (including entries in conference proceedings, festschriften, encyclopedias and exhibition catalogues).

  • ViVa: A Bibliography of Women's History in Historical and Women's Studies Journals ?

    Description: ViVa is a current bibliography of articles about women's and gender history. Articles published in English, French, German and Dutch are selected from more than eighty European, American and Indian Journals.

Some Related Databases

  • Année philologique ?

    Description: This is a specialized bibliographic database of scholarly works relating to all aspects of ancient Greek and Roman civilizations. L’Année philologique covers a wide array of subjects, including Greek and Latin literature and linguistics—which includes early Christian texts and patristics—Greek and Roman history, art, archaeology, philosophy, religion, mythology, music, science, and scholarly subspecialties such as numismatics, papyrology and epigraphy. Abstracts of journal articles are in English, German, Spanish, French or Italian. Books entries often include tables of contents and book review information. Access is limited to 5 concurrent users.

  • Cairn ?

    Description: European French-language database with over 200 full-text journals in the humanities and social sciences.

  • Canadian Periodicals Index Quarterly (CPI.Q) ?

    Description: The CPI provides access to articles from a comprehensive list of Canadian and international journals, magazines, selected sections of the Globe and Mail, Canadian biographies and other reference content from Gale™, all with a Canadian focus. Indexing from 1980 to present; Full-text articles from 1983 to present.

  • Érudit ?

    Description: Canadian French-language database with over 100 full-text journals in the humanities, social sciences and natural sciences. Also contains nearly 20 French-language e-books.

  • FRANCIS ?

    Description: Multilingual social sciences and humanities database. English and French searching options available.

  • JSTOR ?

    Description: JSTOR includes the archives of over one thousand leading academic journals across the humanities, social sciences, and sciences, as well as select monographs and other materials valuable for academic work. The entire corpus is full-text searchable, offers search term highlighting, includes high-quality images, and is interlinked by millions of citations and references. Note: Normally the journals in JSTOR are five years from current; further, all JSTOR journals are available through the "Get it @ Laurentian" link from other databases. JSTOR should NOT be used as at the first resort.

  • Philosopher's Index ?

    Description: The Philosopher's Index is a comprehensive, bibliographic database covering worldwide research in all areas of philosophy. It features: the inclusion of documents from philosophy and interdisciplinary publications, extensive indexing, and author-written abstracts. Philosophers prescreen potential source documents for relevance to the field of philosophy; this enables the inclusion of articles from interdisciplinary journals and contributions from interdisciplinary anthologies that pertain to philosophy. The database provides global coverage, with source publications from more than 135 countries, and has records from 1940 to present, with additional records dating back to 1902. It includes more than 530,000 records in 37 languages. Sources includes: journals (print and e-journal articles from more than 1600 philosophy and interdisciplinary journals); books/monographs, including encyclopedias, dictionaries and book series; anthologies; contributions to anthologies from philosophy and interdisciplinary anthologies; and book reviews.

  • Project MUSE ?

    Description: Project MUSE offers full-text current and archival articles from 600+ scholarly journals from major university presses covering literature and criticism, history, performing arts, cultural studies, education, philosophy, political science, gender studies, and more. Updated continually.

  • Web of Knowledge ?

    Description: A comprehensive research platform that brings together many different types of content including journal articles, patents, websites, conference proceedings, and open access material. Web of Science is located within Web of Knowledge. This resource offers access to journal articles in the sciences, social sciences, arts, and humanities. Web of Science contains over 100 years of research, fully indexed and cross-searchable.

Citation Sources

When researching a paper, it is useful to consult the citations used by the author of an article that you find relevant.  But that article itself may have been cited by other authors after it was first written. Two sources help you identify such citations:

Book Reviews

For sources of Book Reviews and tips on writing a review, consult the Research Guide on this topic.

Getting Articles @ Laurentian

In any database, when you see an article that interests you, click on it and, unless the article is available within the database itself, within the record you will see an image that says "Get it @ Laurentian":

Get it at Laurentian

When you click on that,  you will arrive at a menu which will lead to an electronic copy of the article you want, or, if not available electronically, to Laurentian's catalogue which will allow you to check if the article is available in print in the library, and if not, to a final link which allows you to order the item through Interlibrary loan.

Get Films

Online Film Collections

  • NFB (National Film Board) ?

    Description: The NFB's online Screening Room features over 3,000 films, excerpts, trailers and interactive works (including) documentaries, animation, experimental films and fiction (with a Canadian context or perspective.) Faculty can activate additional CAMPUS tools on their personal NFB account to create playlists of film snippets ("chapters") and entire films for classes; contact Desmond Maley (dmaley@laurentian.ca) for details.

Need a Film Not in Laurentian's Online Film Collections?

​Consult: Watmedia (Provincial Multi-media Catalogue).  Material held by Laurentian may be signed out in the library. To order a film not available at Laurentian, please email LUFilmLibrary@laurentian.ca and specify the date(s) you require the item.

Questions:  Please contact Ashley Thomson who manages the Intrafilm Project.

Primary Sources

Newspapers and Magazines

An index of sources leading to current and historic information in newspapers and magaines is available in a separate research guide.

North American Sources--General

Canada

General

British Columbia

Prairies

  • Peel's Prairie Provinces  A resource dedicated to assisting  researchers in their exploration of western Canadian history and the culture of the Canadian prairies. Contains both an online bibliography of books, pamphlets, and other materials related to the development of the Prairies, as well as a searchable full-text collection of many of these items.

Ontario

United States

International

  • Defining Gender. Source material from British and European archives (1450-1910)
  • Internet History Sourcebooks: A collection of public domain document organized by the following sections:  Ancient History, Medieval History, Modern History, Byzantine Studies plus Other History Sourcebooks: African, East Asian, Global, Indian,  Islamic, Jewish, Lesbian and Gay, Science and Women's History
  • Medieval Travel Writing The chief focus is on journeys to central Asia and the Far East, including accounts of travel to Mongolia, Persia, India, China and South-East Asia.
  • Nineteenth-Century Short Title Catalogue. Printed record of the English-speaking world from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the end of the First World War.
  • World History Matters (Center for History and New Media, GMU)

France

  • Encyclopedia of Diderot & d'Alembert (in English)
  • Gallica Digital Library (BNF) A massive and ongoing retrospective digitization project from the Bibliothèque Nationale de France, of copyright-cleared titles (70 years and older, in accordance with French law) primarily in French but also including English, German, and other languages. Only limited text-recognition has been performed on the images in this collection, which is searchable down to the level of book title, and tables-of-content and index where present.

Great Britain

  • British Hansard, 1803-2005
  • British History Online (some parts subscription) A digital library containing some of the core printed primary and secondary sources for the medieval and modern history of the British Isles.
  • Cambridge Digital Library
  • CELT Corpus of Electronic Texts (University College Cork)
  • Early English Books Online digital facsimile page images of virtually every work printed in England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales and British North America and works in English printed elsewhere from 1473-1700
  • Eighteenth Century Collections Online Works published in the UK during the 18th century plus thousands from elsewhere
  • Eighteenth Century [British] Journals.  Parts I and II. This collection consists of rare newspapers and journals illuminating all aspects of 18th-century social, political and literary life. Individual series in the portal may be searched individually or concurrently. Series I contains periodicals from the Hope Collection of the Bodleian Library; Series II includes newspapers and periodicals from the Harry Ransome Humanities Research Center, University of Texas, and Series III draws on the British Newspaper Library and Cambridge University Library. Collectively, these materials offer effective coverage of the important issues of the period, and are invaluable to the study of all aspects of the 18th century, including crime, sport, advertising, the theatre; fashion; politics, revolution; agriculture; social issues, and society life.
  • Empire Online Provides full text access to primary source documents from the British Empire between 1492 and 2007.
  • Historic Hansard, 1803-2005 Digitised editions of Commons and Lords Hansard
  • History of Parliament Online
  • House of Commons Parliamentary Papers From 1715 to the present, with supplementary material back to 1688
  • Mass Observation Online  British Social History, 1937-1972
  • Old Bailey Online A fully searchable edition of the largest body of texts detailing the lives of non-elite people ever published, containing 197,745 criminal trials held at London's central criminal court between 1674 and 1913)
 
 

Citing Sources and Zotero

Why Cite?

We cite sources to acknowledge the work of others, as well as to avoid academic dishonesty or plagiarism.

The University of Toronto has made available a comprehensive set of guidelines on "How NOT to Plagiarize" which deserves to be read by every student.

Citation Styles in Laurentian's History Program

At Laurentian, professors will specify the citation style to be used. In History, it is normally Chicago.

The Chicago style is included in Laurentian's Citation Style Guides.

ZOTERO

Zotero is a free, web-based citation manager that allows you to: 

  • Directly import references from article databases, the library catalogue, e-book collections, etc.
  • Manage and organize your references.
  • Create a bibliography.
  • Share your references with others
  • Add in-text citation and a bibliography directly into your assignment 

Getting started with Zotero: