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Sports Administration - Recommended resources

  • Business Source Complete ?

    Description: "Indexes and abstracts the most important scholarly business journals, dating back as far as 1886. In addition, searchable cited references are provided for more than 1,300 journals" - publisher's description (4/1/2013).

  • ProQuest Business Databases ?

    Description: Searches through the following databases: ABI/Inform Global, ABI/Inform Trade & Industry, and Proquest Asian Business & Reference

  • SPORTDiscus ?

    Description: Covers all subjects related to sports, including kinesiology, sport administration, sport psychology, education, coaching, nutrition, public heath, rehabilitation, and therapy. Access is limited to 4 concurrent users.

Sports Administration - Other databases

  • Scholars Portal - Ejournals ?

    Description: Scholars Portal is a digital repository of over 20 million scholarly articles drawn from journals covering every academic discipline.

  • Google Scholar ?

    Set your "Library Links" to include "Laurentian University - Get full text" at https://scholar.google.ca/scholar_settings for easy off-campus access

    Description: "Google Scholar provides a simple way to broadly search for scholarly literature... across many disciplines and sources: articles, theses, books, abstracts and court opinions, from academic publishers, professional societies, online repositories, universities and other web sites."

  • EBSCOhost Platform Databases ?

    Description: Multidisciplinary platform containing many databases in different disciplines, such as the humanities, social sciences, education, arts and natural sciences.

  • ProQuest Platform Databases ?

    Description: Multidisciplinary platform containing many databases in multiple disciplines, such as the humanities, social sciences, education, arts and natural sciences.

Subject Librarian

DScott's picture
Name: Dan Scott
Position Title: Systems Librarian
Email Address: dscott
Extension: 3315
Office Location: 30-251

Choosing a topic

Encyclopedias

The research process

 

 

General guidelines

When you have to write a research essay or a case study analysis, you must first determine the extent of information needed to complete your assignment.  No matter your topic or subject, before you undertake any research you should ask yourself the following questions:

  • What do I know?
  • What do I need to know?
  • How will I find out?*

Answering these questions will give you the opportunity to gauge your own knowledge base on the subject, and to consequently develop an appropriate search strategy. 

Depending on what you already know, you may need to gather some background information on your topic before you can begin your research.  Dictionaries and encyclopedias are two sources that can help you with this process.  For additional background information, you may also want to consult alternative sources of information: experts in the field, family and friends, media sources (if appropriate), etc. 

 

*Burkhardt, J. M., MacDonald, M. C., & Rathemacher, A. J. (2010). Teaching information literacy: 50 standards-based exercises for college students. Chicago: American Library Association.(page 21)

Finding books

Finding e-books

There are two different options when searching for e-books:

  1. Search the library catalogue, and limit the item format to "Electronic".  Please note that not all e-books are catalogued, and that by limiting the document type to electronic, you may also retrieve other items such as journals, government documents, etc.
  2. Search the library's e-book collections.   Searching e-book collections is similar to searching in the catalogue.  I recommend searching either by subject or keyword.

Tips for using e-books

  • Some e-books can only be consulted by one searcher at a time.
  • The number of pages that can be printed or downloaded from an e-book is set by the publisher.
  • Some e-book collections will allow you to export your references to Zotero, a powerful, free citation manager.

Library Catalogue

You can search the library's catalogue by:

  • Keyword
  • Title
  • Journal Title
  • Author
  • Subject

Tips and tricks:

  • By default, the results screen displays 10 documents per page
  • Results can be sorted by: Title, Author, Date, Relevance
  • The record summary is where you’ll find the information necessary to retrieve your document:
    • Name of the library
    • Copy location
    • Call number
  • For electronic resources, a direct link to the document is provided in the record summary.
  • You can export your references to RefWorks

Recommended E-book Collections

Ebrary

A multidisciplinary collection with a subject filter.  

Emerald Business, Management and Economics Collection

This collection is primarily focused on commerce and economics.  Limit your search to e-books by selecting "books" from the drop down menu beneath the search box.

Oxford Scholarship Online

A multidisciplinary collection with the option to browse books by subject, see "Business and Management".

SourceOECD

Content in this collection is primarily focused on commerce and economics.  When searching, limit to "only subscribed titles".

SpringerLink

A multidisciplinary collection with the ability to browse books by subject.  If you're only interested in finding e-books, limit to "search within books".

Scholars Portal Ebooks

A multidisciplinary collection with some sport and business content.  When searching, remember to select “full text only”. 

WorldCat

With nearly 200 million records representing titles held by nearly 75,000 libraries you will find almost any book ever published in the English language in WorldCat.
Search Tips:  Once you log-in, click on the Help Button: Help button
After your search, when you see a title that interests you, click on it and within the record you will see an image for "Get it @ Laurentian" :
   Get it @ Laurentian
When you click on that, you will be led to a menu which allows you to check for availability in Laurentian’s catalogue or order the item through ILL - Interlibrary Loan.
Note: While a free version of WorldCat is available online, we recommend that you use the university's subscription version of WorldCat because it offers the "Get it @ Laurentian" feature and more powerful search functionality.

Library of Congress Classification

All print books and periodicals are organized according to the Library of Congress System.

  • GV 557 - 1198.995 Sports
  • GV 201 - 555 Physical education and training
  • HF 1 - 6182 Commerce
  • RC 1200 - 1245 Sports medicine
  • RM 695 - 893 Physical medicine. Physical therapy

Finding articles

Recommended resources

  • Business Source Complete ?

    Description: "Indexes and abstracts the most important scholarly business journals, dating back as far as 1886. In addition, searchable cited references are provided for more than 1,300 journals" - publisher's description (4/1/2013).

  • ProQuest Business Databases ?

    Description: Searches through the following databases: ABI/Inform Global, ABI/Inform Trade & Industry, and Proquest Asian Business & Reference

  • SPORTDiscus ?

    Description: Covers all subjects related to sports, including kinesiology, sport administration, sport psychology, education, coaching, nutrition, public heath, rehabilitation, and therapy. Access is limited to 4 concurrent users.

Other databases

  • Scholars Portal - Ejournals ?

    Description: Scholars Portal is a digital repository of over 20 million scholarly articles drawn from journals covering every academic discipline.

  • Google Scholar ?

    Set your "Library Links" to include "Laurentian University - Get full text" at https://scholar.google.ca/scholar_settings for easy off-campus access

    Description: "Google Scholar provides a simple way to broadly search for scholarly literature... across many disciplines and sources: articles, theses, books, abstracts and court opinions, from academic publishers, professional societies, online repositories, universities and other web sites."

  • EBSCOhost Platform Databases ?

    Description: Multidisciplinary platform containing many databases in different disciplines, such as the humanities, social sciences, education, arts and natural sciences.

  • ProQuest Platform Databases ?

    Description: Multidisciplinary platform containing many databases in multiple disciplines, such as the humanities, social sciences, education, arts and natural sciences.

Finding Full Text

Each database displays full text options differently.  To locate full text, here are some of the things to look for:

  • A direct link to the html version or a PDF document.
  • This enables you to find full text when available. 
  • If full text is not available, you can search the library catalogue for the print-journal.
  •  When you're unable to find full text online or in print, you can request the item through interlibrary loan (Racer)

Search tips

  • Use AND to limit your search
    • Example: marketing AND "Olympic games"
  • Use OR to expand your search
    • Example NFL OR CFL
  • Need to address multiple spellings of a term or name, use truncation
    • Example: Niet*che
  • Looking for a specific type of content?  Limit your search by document type.
  • Is currency important for your topic?  Limit your search by providing a date range.

Searching the Web

Five criteria for evaluating web pages

When you undertake research on the Web, it's important to critically evaluate everything you read.  These five criteria will help you determine if the information is reliable and appropriate to use for your research.

1 - Accuracy

Is the author citing their sources of information, including statistical data?  With the information provided, will you be able to verify the contents with another source?  If the author provides links to other websites, would you consider these reliable sources of information? 

As with any other source you would consult, the information provided needs to be verifiable.  If you can't verify something that is stated as fact on a website, you can safely assume that some of the information may not reliable and that you should look elsewhere. 

2 - Authority

When consulting a website, is it clear who authored the content?  Can you locate contact information?  What are the author(s) credentials?  If it's a website run by an organization or professional association, what's its mission? 

Authority is important since anyone can create content on the web.  If there is no authoring and contact information for a given website, I would recommend that you continue your search.

3 - Objectivity

Is the information on the website fact or opinion?  Can you tell if the information is biased?  If it's a controversial topic, does the website take a neutral stance or is it slanted to a particular point of view?  Are the authors trying to present opinion as fact?  Is the website sponsored?  Do ads appear on the website?  What other sites does the website link to?

Remember that just because something looks reliable on the web, it may be slanted towards a group's or company's own interests.  If the website is sponsored or has ads, look at the content to determine if the site was created as a means of promoting a particular product, service or ideology.  If links to other websites are provided, take the time to examine these other sites.  For example, if a website about abortion is mainly linking to anti-abortion groups, it's safe to assume that the information on the site may not be neutral.

4 - Currency

When was the website last updated?  Are there dead links?  Can you find information telling you when the website was created?   

If you can't find a date anywhere, it may be difficult determine the website's currency.  A website with no dates and broken links may indicate that the site is out-of-date and / or poorly maintained.  

5 - Purpose and intended audience

Who are the author(s) trying to reach with the website (children, adults, professionals)?  Why do you think the author(s) created the website?  Are the author(s) trying to sell you something, collect your personal information, etc.?  

When you approach content on the web, the first thing you should consider is the target audience.  A website constructed for children, in most cases, is not appropriate when you're doing research at a university level.  If you're doing research on the internet, preferably, you should be consulting sites geared towards specialists in a given field.  Another point to consider is the website's purpose.  Websites whose aim is to sell you something or gather your personal information may not be reliable sources to consult.  Furthermore, if a website is looking to promote a particular group or ideology, it may not be the most objective source of information.

 

This search engine alllows you to locate scholarly resources with an interface you already know.  Through Google scholar, you can locate a wide range of documents including: articles, books, abstracts, etc. 

To get the best results, you should search Google scholar the same way as you would any other database, by making use of its search operators.  For more information, please consult Google's Advanced Scholar Search Tips.

Wikipedia is useful when gathering background information, and locating other sources of information.  Always look at the reference list and the "further reading" section.  These references may help you find other sources that could be of use.  You should also compare what you're reading on Wikipedia with another encyclopedia, or reliable source of information to detect any errors, discrepancies, or bias.

Remember that not all articles have a neutral point of view.  When researching controversial topics (abortion, religion, politics, etc.), you should consult both the article's history and the discussion page.  This may help you determine any bias or recent acts of vandalism on an article.  Furthermore it allows to read discussions regarding content that is added to the article. 

Data and statistics

Statistics for Canada

E-STAT

An interactive tool about society and the economy in Canada. Data can be displayed in the form of tables, graphs and maps for several geographic areas. Data comes from approximately 270 tables from CANSIM, the Censuses of population and agriculture and the Survey of Aboriginal Peoples.:

2006 Community Profiles (Statistics Canada - Census 2006 Data)

These profiles present community-level information from the 2006 Census of Population. Users can search for an area of interest by typing its 'place name' in the box below or by clicking on a province or territory from the list below and selecting the area from a list.

International data and statistics

Eurostat

The Statistical Office of the European Communities.  The website is updated daily and provides direct access to the latest and most complete statistical information available on the European Union, the EU Member States, the euro-zone and other countries.

OECD iLibrary Statistics

Provides a single online platform where users can discover and access statistical databases from the OECD. You will be able to build tables and extract data from across databases as well as work within individual databases. Includes data and metadata for OECD countries and selected non-member economies.

UNData

A portal to United Nations databases.  Currently, there are 24 databases and 6 glossaries containing approximately 60 million data points and covering a whole range of statistics including Population, Industry, Energy, Trade and National Accounts.  Useful features like Country Profiles, Advanced Search and Glossaries are also provided to aid research.

Need further assistance?

If you have any questions or data requests, please email: data@laurentian.ca

You can also consult the Data and Statistics subject guide.

Business resources

Canadian Business Patterns (See DLI contact)

"The Canadian Business Patterns contains data that reflects counts of business locations (as of December 2008) and business establishments (prior to December 2009) by: 9 employment size ranges, including "indeterminate" (as of December 1997); geography groupings: province/territory, census division, census subdivision (before December 2008), census metropolitan area and census agglomeration; and industry using the North American Industry Classification System (tables at the 2, 3, 4 and 6-digit level) as of December 1998. Before December 2004, these data were also presented using the Standard Industrial Classification (tables at the 1, 2, 3 and 4-digit level). A concordance table showing the relationships between both classification systems is included with the product. 

The data published in the Canadian Business Patterns represents the current number of locations or establishments for a specific reference period which is taken from the Business Register Central Frame Data Base. It is not intended for use as a time series because changes that affect the continuity of the data might result from changes in methodology. Some examples are: the change to another version of the Standard Geographical Classification (SGC) or the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), the addition of the new territory of Nunavut and new rules to better identify inactive units." (Source: Statistics Canada)

 

Market Research Handbook

The handbook is designed to be a comprehensive source of socio-economic statistics for all those who study the Canadian consumer market - market researchers, strategists, product planners and sales leaders. The broad range of data are equally relevant to consumer and business-to-business marketing. They present profiles of key industries including the small business sector, as well as of consumers in all provinces and 45 major cities. International trade data and projections - of population, households, families and selected economic indicators, etc. - provide information for businesses seeking to expand or develop new product lines. (Source:Statistics Canada)

Business studies and economics: key resources (Statistics Canada)

Grouping of business and economics resources.  Types of documents include: articles, publications, reference materials, external links and data.  For data, you just need to click on the tab titled "data". 

Citing your sources

ZOTERO

Zotero is a free, web-based citation manager that allows you to: 

  • Directly import references from article databases, the library catalogue, e-book collections, etc.
  • Manage and organize your references.
  • Create a bibliography.
  • Share your references with others
  • Add in-text citation and a bibliography directly into your assignment 

Getting started with Zotero:

Quick Tips

  • Always ask your professor which citation style you should use. 
  • Keep accurate notes on each source you consult.  These notes will ensure that you have all the necessary information needed to create a complete bibliography.  Using an application such as RefWorks will facilitate this process. 
  • When citing information from the internet, be certain to jot down the exact date the item was consulted and bookmark the website.
  • When taking notes from a source, put quotation marks around anything you haven't paraphrased or summarized.  This will ensure that you don't accidentally plagiarize later on when you begin writing your assignment.  For more information, consult the guide titled “How not to plagiarize” (Source: Writing Centre - U of T)
  • Information that falls under common knowledge does not need to be cited.  An example of common knowledge would be that the earth revolves around the sun.
  • To properly paraphrase and summarize, it requires that you thoroughly understand the passage or article you’re reading.  When you don’t fully grasp the concepts presented, it’s best to try and locate another source with similar content presented and/or explained differently.  For more information concerning paraphrase and summary, please consult the guide titled “Paraphrase and summary” (Source: Writing Centre - U of T)

Putting it all together